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Vocal responses to multi-dimensional acoustic perturbations
Chuck Larson, Hideki Takaso, Jean Sun and Timothy Hain

Speakers rarely experience acoustical stimuli that change in a single dimension, such as loudness. Most sounds consist of concomitant changes in pitch and loudness. Recent studies have demonstrated that speakers produce compensatory responses to perturbations in either pitch or loudness of voice auditory feedback. Other studies have demonstrated that perturbations in loudness of a sound also result in perceptual changes in frequency of a sound. The present study was conducted to determine if perturbations in both pitch and loudness of voice feedback resulted in changes in voice fundamental frequency (F0) or amplitude, or both dimensions of the voice. Subjects’ voice feedback was modulated in either pitch or loudness, or both dimensions simultaneously, and fed back to them in real time during sustained /u/ vocalizations. Latency and magnitude measures of voice F0 and amplitude event-related averages revealed responses in both dimensions. Measures also revealed interactions between the stimuli and suggest that errors in perceptual identification of multidimensional acoustical perturbations can increase variability in voice F0 or loudness.

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